Fresh cilantro, also known as coriander or Chinese parsley, often finds its way into various culinary preparations due to its distinctive, robust flavor.

Yet, some individuals may seek alternatives due to cilantro aversion, allergies, or simple unavailability.

Parsley and culantro make top-notch substitutes due to their similar texture and refreshing flavor, respectively, though each imparts a unique spin on the dish.

👅 Flavor Profile

Fresh cilantro possesses a bold, lemony flavor, coupled with an undertone of peppery nuances. Its taste, often described as bright and citrusy, infuses a refreshing zing into dishes. It’s also notable for its crisp, delicate texture that tends to soften upon cooking. Parsley and culantro, amongst others, share similarities with this flavor profile.

🔄 The closest replacements/substitutes

Here are ten substitutes for fresh cilantro, arranged according to their flavor similarity and versatility.

1. Parsley

parsley as fresh cilantro substitutes

Parsley is one of the most common substitutes for cilantro. It has a milder flavor compared to cilantro, which makes it a suitable replacement especially for those who find cilantro’s flavor too strong. However, it does not have the citrusy undertones of cilantro.

Taste and Texture Comparison: The taste is fresh and slightly peppery, and its texture is quite similar to cilantro when chopped.

Nutritional Comparison: Parsley is packed with vitamins A, C, and K, and has a similar nutritional profile to cilantro.

Price and Availability Comparison: Parsley is widely available in most grocery stores and is usually similarly priced to cilantro.

2. Thai Basil

Thai Basil has a stronger, spicier flavor, but its citrusy undertones can mimic those of cilantro. It’s an excellent substitute in Thai or Vietnamese dishes.

Taste and Texture Comparison: Thai Basil has a spicier, anise-like flavor. Its leaves are a bit sturdier than cilantro.

Nutritional Comparison: Like cilantro, Thai Basil is rich in vitamins A and C, as well as calcium and iron.

Price and Availability Comparison: Thai Basil can be a bit harder to find and a little more expensive than cilantro, especially outside of Asian markets.

Thai basil as fresh cilantro substitutes

3. Mint

Mint is another herb that can be used as a substitute for cilantro. It has a strong, cool flavor profile that can bring a refreshing twist to dishes that typically use cilantro.

Taste and Texture Comparison: While mint is distinctly different in taste, it provides a fresh aroma and flavor that can somewhat mimic cilantro’s refreshing quality. Its texture is somewhat similar to cilantro when chopped.

Nutritional Comparison: Mint is rich in vitamins A and C, much like cilantro, and it also provides a moderate amount of iron.

Price and Availability Comparison: Mint is widely available in most grocery stores and is similarly priced to cilantro.

If you don’t have a fresh or dry mint at home, you can use one of this mint substitutes.

4. Chervil

Chervil, often used in French cuisine, offers a mild flavor that’s a blend between parsley and anise. It could serve as a substitute for cilantro in some dishes.

Taste and Texture Comparison: Chervil has a mild flavor with hints of anise, and its leaves are softer and more delicate than cilantro.

Nutritional Comparison: Chervil offers a good amount of vitamin C, calcium, and iron, comparable to cilantro.

Price and Availability Comparison: Chervil can be harder to find and may be more expensive than cilantro, especially outside of specialty or gourmet stores.

5. Lemon Basil

Lemon basil, with its citrusy flavor, can serve as a replacement for cilantro in recipes where that tangy taste is desirable.

Taste and Texture Comparison: Lemon basil has a light, citrusy flavor. It is similar to cilantro in terms of texture when chopped.

Nutritional Comparison: Like cilantro, lemon basil is rich in vitamin A and C, and it provides a moderate amount of iron.

Price and Availability Comparison: Lemon basil may be slightly harder to find in regular grocery stores compared to cilantro, but it is usually available in farmers’ markets during the summer.

6. Tarragon

Tarragon, an herb commonly used in French cuisine, can substitute for cilantro, especially when a hint of licorice flavor is suitable for the dish.

Taste and Texture Comparison: Tarragon has a unique flavor, slightly similar to anise or licorice. The texture is a bit tougher than cilantro but it softens when cooked.

Nutritional Comparison: Tarragon is high in vitamins A and C, much like cilantro. It also offers potassium and iron.

Price and Availability Comparison: Tarragon can be found in most grocery stores, but it may be slightly more expensive than cilantro.

7. Carrot Greens

If you find yourself out of cilantro, the greens at the top of your carrots could make an interesting substitute.

Taste and Texture Comparison: Carrot greens have a slightly sweet, herbaceous flavor that’s somewhat similar to cilantro. The texture, however, is a bit more fibrous and tough.

Nutritional Comparison: Carrot greens are rich in vitamins A and C, potassium, and calcium.

Price and Availability Comparison: Carrot greens often come attached to fresh carrots and are a great way to reduce food waste. They are not usually sold separately.

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8. Oregano

While oregano has a different flavor profile, it can bring its own unique touch to dishes as a cilantro substitute.

Taste and Texture Comparison: Oregano has a robust, earthy flavor. It’s more pungent than cilantro, but it can bring a depth of flavor to dishes. The texture is slightly similar to cilantro when chopped.

Nutritional Comparison: Oregano is rich in vitamins A, C, E, and K, as well as fiber, folate, iron, magnesium, vitamin B6, calcium, and potassium.

Price and Availability Comparison: Oregano is widely available in most grocery stores and is similarly priced to cilantro.

9. Arugula

Arugula, also known as rocket, can offer a peppery alternative to cilantro’s flavor.

Taste and Texture Comparison: Arugula has a peppery, slightly bitter taste. Its texture is a bit more delicate than cilantro.

Nutritional Comparison: Arugula is rich in calcium, potassium, folate, Vitamin C, K, and A.

Price and Availability Comparison: Arugula is readily available in most supermarkets, and it’s typically sold for a similar price as cilantro.

🔪 How to Use Fresh Cilantro Substitutes in Recipes

In this section, we’ll explore how these cilantro substitutes can be used in a variety of cuisines and dishes, offering a unique spin to the flavors and taking the dining experience to a whole new level.

Mexican Dishes

Mexican cuisine often uses cilantro for its distinct and refreshing flavor. In cases where cilantro isn’t available, parsley and carrot greens can be used in dishes like guacamole, salsa, and tacos. Their fresh flavors can closely mimic the zest that cilantro adds to these recipes.

Indian Curries

Cilantro is a staple in Indian cuisine, particularly in curries. Substitutes like parsley or culantro can be used in these dishes. They blend well with the heavy spices and provide a similar texture and freshness as cilantro.

Thai Soups

Thai soups are often garnished with fresh herbs, including cilantro. In its absence, substitutes like Thai basil or mint can be used. They add a different yet equally refreshing flavor to these hot, savory dishes.

Mediterranean Salads

Mediterranean salads, known for their crisp freshness, can also benefit from cilantro substitutes. Herbs like parsley or oregano can be used, which bring their own unique flavors that blend well with the olive oil-based dressings typical in these salads.

Stir-fry Dishes

Cilantro often adds a fresh finish to stir-fry dishes. Carrot greens or parsley can be used as a substitute, adding a similar pop of color and freshness to the dish, ensuring it is just as appealing to the eyes as it is to the palate.

💡 Tips and Guidance

Experimenting with cilantro substitutes is a great way to discover new flavors and textures in your favorite recipes. Here are some tips to make the most out of these substitutes:

  1. Always add fresh herbs at the end of the cooking process to retain their flavor and color.
  2. When substituting, start with half the amount of cilantro the recipe calls for and adjust according to your taste.
  3. Keep in mind that while these substitutes can mimic the flavor of cilantro, they also bring their own unique taste to the dish.
  4. Be creative and don’t be afraid to mix and match different herbs. Sometimes, the best flavors come from unexpected combinations!
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About me:

Hi, I'm Alex. I love to cook and bake, and I'm always looking for new recipes to try. I started this blog — to collect and share most delicious and easy recipes in one place. I remember, how many questions recipes raised to me, when I started cooking. To make sure that doesn't happen to you, I take step-by-step photos of the cooking process for every recipe so you can see how all the steps are supposed to go together, even if you're not following my recipes exactly.

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